8 thoughts on “”

  1. It has to do with red as a color. It has the most energy of any color on the visible spectrum, so we notice gradiations in it more, because we have more to compare it to. We’re far less likely to notice gradiation in purple because it doesn’t have the same energy spectrum.
    Also the same reason why we don’t “red-screen” very often, it bleeds too often compared to blue and green screening, because of the energy spectrum it has.

      1. That could be attributed to variations in compression implementation and such. I dunno. If you really want to find out go look up some technical documents.

        1. I don’t know about that. I’ve raised and lowered compression on JPEGs with red in them like that, and after a certain point, the red parts halved in resolution. I doubt it’s any problem with that particular image.

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